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Hey everyone!! I'm hoping some of you can help me. I was wondering if any of you have any suggestions or know of any articles on helping Chance with his fear aggression and his like new people new places anxiety that he gets. As well as his over the top protection when it comes to me. Plus we found out just recently that he's a very male dominant dog and doesn't care all that much for other male dogs... or at least the one that my ex was looking into adopting. 

He's leash reactive with some people when we walk by them, others he could care less about. He jumps and nips people when they come into the house ESPECIALLY if i'm in the room. He's not a fan of meeting new people and I would like him to meet new people and not be afraid he's gonna bite them. He's also super protective of me, so like new people he's very skittish about and gets really aggressive and is always on watch. With my ex he isn't as protective over him as he is with me. 

Another thing is he's very male dominant. my ex was looking into a 9 month old husky mix who wasn't fixed yet and Chance apparently barked the whole time, lunged towards the dog on the leash and his fur was standing up on his back. They brought in a female dog and he calmed down drastically. now i know that dogs tend to not like certain dogs and certain sexes, kind of like humans, so i get that. but if there is any way that i can help calm him down with that and to help it so he's not so dominant that would be greatly appreciated !! 

i'm just very concerned for Chance and the people that he will be around in the future and I know there will be children (my exes nephews) around in the future and I just want to make everyone's experience together a memorable one for the right reasons. i want my dog to feel safe and not scared all the time and I want to be able to feel at ease and not worried when and if he's gonna bite someone. 

So please any advice from research or past experiences or from previous training sessions, please feel free to share them. along with any articles that i could read that would be beneficial and help us.  Heart
A lot of advice that can be given really needs observation to be helpful. IE, when he jumps people in your house, what does it look like? Is it truly protectiveness over you? Over his space? Or is it over-the-top excitement that leads to nipping? Look into mat work for this issue, though again, you really need someone who can get eyes on to say for sure.

If you think it's protectiveness of you, triple check. Do you tense up when people come in or dogs come near? If so, you may be feeding fear - different from protective instinct. He could be reacting to your reaction in a negative feedback loop.

Same with dog-on-dog aggression. It could be male dominance or it could be male fear. For this you will be looking into threshold work with a game that says "there's a dog here's a treat" and work distance. Again, need eyes on this as if it's purely arousal vs actual aggression vs fear aggression, the training may differ.

From you description it's also hard to tell if his problem is unchecked arousal (impulse control issues) or fear (empowerment/counter-conditioning work). Look into those respectively.
(10-24-2017, 01:21 PM)Ember Wrote: [ -> ]A lot of advice that can be given really needs observation to be helpful. IE, when he jumps people in your house, what does it look like? Is it truly protectiveness over you? Over his space? Or is it over-the-top excitement that leads to nipping? Look into mat work for this issue, though again, you really need someone who can get eyes on to say for sure.

If you think it's protectiveness of you, triple check. Do you tense up when people come in or dogs come near? If so, you may be feeding fear - different from protective instinct. He could be reacting to your reaction in a negative feedback loop.

Same with dog-on-dog aggression. It could be male dominance or it could be male fear. For this you will be looking into threshold work with a game that says "there's a dog here's a treat" and work distance. Again, need eyes on this as if it's purely arousal vs actual aggression vs fear aggression, the training may differ.

From you description it's also hard to tell if his problem is unchecked arousal (impulse control issues) or fear (empowerment/counter-conditioning work). Look into those respectively.


the jumping is a mixture of protection over his space and over excitement of people that leads to nipping.

i try not to bc i know that he’ll feed off of that energy. he bite my dad the first time they met unprovoked but he was in a new environment, lots of smells and i was with him. so since i’ve been vary but then i read about my energy and i’ve been doing my absolute best to stay positive and. not be negative or let off any tension. but i’ll look into the mat training.

and yeah i don’t tense up with other dogs. he’s good with females males he’s weird with. but i will try to reward him and make seeing other dogs a good thing. and with the type of arousal. it’s both. it’s excitement and it’s fear. depends on the dog. the day etc.

i will definitely look into those two things as well. thank you.


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Play is also a powerful tool if Chance has a toy that he is willing to engage with. This will have to be done with distance work but instead of "there's a dog here's a treat" it's "there's a dog let's play a game". For this, though, you will be working to manage arousal levels - tug is not a good game for this, for instance, since it brings arousal up. You want to look into self play and engagement so that the reward is "There's a dog and now this is fun".
Oh dear, I really feel for you, this really does need a behaviourist to spend time with him and work closely with you on helping him. From what you describe it sounds to me as though he is a fearful dog in general. This can be by nature (DNA) or nurture (in the past, he is a rescue yeah) or a combination of both. I would encourage you to not consider his behaviour in respect to you as protectiveness of you as such but instead as protecting himself from losing a valued resource. You are a valuable resource and he is guarding his resource as opposed to protecting you personally from perceived harm. It has been my experience that fearfulness and guarding issues often go hand in hand.

It sounds to me as though there is a huge amount of work ahead of you to help this boy and you really do need professional help with mapping out a plan. It will not be a quick fix and will take patience and consistency. It is also unrealistic to think this can be permanently fixed. Yes it can be improved tremendously so as to appear almost non-existent and managed well but you must always remain mindful of his tendencies and not push him too far.

In the meantime avoid all opportunities for him to rehearse these behaviours. Every time he behaves in a certain way and he perceives it as working for him, reinforces the behaviour.

I would probably lay odds on his behaviour towards other dogs "not" actually being about dominance at all but again fear based. The amazing canine olfactory system is telling him a story about the other dogs he meets or even catches scent of on the wind. The hormonal scent is of course different for each dog particularly in respect to whether they are intact or not. If he is uncomfortable about what he smells he is likely behaving from fear rather than assertiveness.
I'd like to add that until some of his issues can be addressed, anytime he will be around small children keep him leashed and if possible, muzzled. It's always better to be safe. 
Kids can be unpredictable and dogs who aren't used to kids can be too.

I hope you can get things worked out for Chance.
Chance was adopted from a shelter when he was one year old, right? And he is now 3 years old? Has this behavior been continual, or just recent?

Sunny
First I would stop seeing everything as dominance. It is a slippery slope. Also reactively is ALWAYS fear based, the dog needs compassion not been seen as dominant,
A truly dominant dog is NOT reactive, it is calm, confident, it has nothing to prove.
I would suggest you read any of the following
Grisha Stewart. BAT
Any of Turid Rugass, Patricia Connell, Suzanne Clothier, just a few off the top of my head
(10-24-2017, 04:01 PM)only-borders Wrote: [ -> ]I'd like to add that until some of his issues can be addressed, anytime he will be around small children keep him leashed and if possible, muzzled. It's always better to be safe. 
Kids can be unpredictable and dogs who aren't used to kids can be too.

I hope you can get things worked out for Chance.


oh i’m very aware of this and he won’t be around them until he is trusted.


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(10-25-2017, 10:38 AM)Quirkydog Wrote: [ -> ]First I would stop seeing everything as dominance. It is a slippery slope. Also reactively is ALWAYS fear based, the dog needs compassion not been seen as dominant,
A truly dominant dog is NOT reactive, it is calm, confident, it has nothing to prove.
I would suggest you read any of the following
Grisha Stewart. BAT
Any of Turid Rugass, Patricia Connell, Suzanne Clothier, just a few off the top of my head


well i only said male dominant because my ex had him at the humane society to see how he did with another dog and that’s what the lady who worked there claimed he was. but i’ll be sure to look into your suggestions.


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