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With all the storms and fires and people having to evacuate it has made me think I need to put together an emergency/evacuation plan and supplies.  My thought was to get two or three Rubbermaid roughneck totes and use them for supplies I would need if I had to evacuate.  I keep leashes for the dogs and current vaccination records for all my pets in the glove box of the car so that isn't something I need to worry about.  I have a bag I take to dog classes that is always packed with the things I need for class.  But if I had to evacuate I know I would need more.  Medicine, food, cat box and litter.  I have two cats and would need someway to keep them contained in the car.  I have a couple of bags I use to take them to the vet but I would need something large enough to hold both cats and a small litter box.

Some things I wouldn't pack ahead of time would be food, Mattie's prescription medicine, etc. but I'm thinking I could put a list of things I needed to pack along with zip lock bags to hold food (under stress I don't want to worry about having enough zip lock bags). 

Has anyone else thought of this?  What sort of things would you pack ahead of time and what would be on your list to pack last minute?
I think it is a great idea to be evacuation ready. It is something our authorities actively promote via all forms of social media particularly in the lead up to bush fire and cyclone season. Depending on the age of children I feel they should also be included in a drill. Some might think this is over the top but from my experience I realise that a well drilled routine serves many purposes. If every family member has a list of tasks it not only gets the job done more efficiently but also reduces the risk of panic particularly with children. Delegation can be your best friend and helps mum keep a cooler head because you are not worrying about everything.

You can put a chart discretely on the inside of a cupboard door with a felt pen attached on a string and as each task is complete on each persons list it is crossed off. Mum doesn't have to keep track of what every family member is up to because the chart shows all and confirms that the task is done. I believe children perform astoundingly well when they have a responsibility in an emergency and are practiced at it. Each family member should also be practiced at other members tasks because you never know in a busy family who is going to be home at the time.
Doing drills can be fun for the children, like a competitive game judged on speed, accuracy and NEATNESS haha. It helps give mum more confidence when you have reason to know there are things you can rely on the children for. Your mind can be in a much better place for the spur of the moment decisions that are inevitable.
It is not everywhere in every country that you might need to think this way I suppose but if you live in one of the ever increasing places where there is high risk of serious weather events being prepared is very important I think.

In a past life (career) one of my tasks was overseeing the evacuation of people (hundreds at a time) and I truely believe delegation (and being able to have confidence in your delegates) and drill is your best friend. A family evacuation might be small but is the most important of them all really and emotions can run high and confuse things..

I reckon you have your head around all the tasks and I can only add to ensure you always have several 10lt sealed water vessels in your garage (supermarket type) and a human/dog first aid kit permanently in your car.
We can have really crazy weather here in the midwest. We have always tried to be prepared for the humans and the dogs.

It might be interesting to see what everyone has in place for an emergency. Some of the things we have in a duffel bag for the dogs are, leashes, blankets, bowls, vet wrap, antiseptic ointment, water, boots, coats, vet records, etc. 

What's in your kit?
I keep all shot records, county registration, and proof of ownership papers together in a plastic shoebox. All leashes, collars, tags, harnesses, are in one spot beside their normal crates. I buy food in small bags and keep a tote with everyone's food(rotated out every time I buy more food), spare leashes, towels, and room for the shoebox in it. Their Thundershirts are on top of their crates and would likely already be on them if we needed to evacuate. I have crates that are fitted to our van in the garage by the door, so we just drive up, open the door, and pop them in. Everything needed with those crates stays with those crates.
Wow, Gideon's mom, you are so organized!  I don't live in an area where evacuation may ever be an issue but I think it is good to have a plan. I had not thought of the Thundershirt since it is a new item for me but that would be something I would want to have.

I'm not totally clueless when it comes to being prepared.  I always have vaccination records, pick-up bags, leashes, water bowl, and water in the car.  I also have a backpack with a couple of kitchen garbage bags (useful when you have a kid that gets carsick), first aid kit for both humans and pups, two compact umbrellas, a safety vest and work gloves (for changing a tire), a towel, knee pad (the kind used when gardening but I thought useful if changing a tire), toilet paper (loo roll), paper towels and hand soap.  Nevada has lots of remote places with rest areas that have running water and flushing toilets only and you need to supply your own tissue, soap, and paper towels.   If I am driving through the desert I carry enough food and water to get me to my destination and back without having to stop.  I also carry enough cash to get me to my destination.  I have never had to use it but I worry about not being able to purchase fuel or food if the computers go out.  

My son used to be at university in the northern part of the state.  We would often drive to get him for Christmas and I always packed a couple of gallons of water, lots of blankets and our winter coats that we never use since the temperatures are too warm where we live.  I also would pack a bunch of very high calorie snacks just in case we got stuck in the snow.

My county doesn't require registration so I have a printout from the county website.  Hopefully, that will work if I ever get questioned about registration.
(09-13-2017, 10:19 PM)Tasha Wrote: [ -> ]I'm not totally clueless when it comes to being prepared.  

I want to apologize if this makes me sound irritable.  Earlier this week I had a conversation with a school administrator regarding a football game where the players and students were outside during an intense thunderstorm.  When I told him this was dangerous and gave him a printout from the National Weather Service regarding safety during thunderstorms I got the papers thrown back in my face and was yelled at at told he "followed procedure".  So I guess I am irritable but it has nothing to do with the comments here.
LOL! If you knew me well, you would know that I'm next to not at all organized, so I have to find tricks that work for me. I always put paperwork for the pets in the exact same place as soon as I get them(I clean out the old papers every few years). When I am about to need to use the food in the tote, I know it's time to order more, then it goes in the tote when it arrives. We have a spot where we always leash and unleash for walks, so that's where we always leave leashes and collars.

Sorry about your experience with the school admin. I hate encounters like that and tend to stew about them for hours and hours. They ruin my day.
Well, you gave me a great idea.  I had to clean the garage today (swamp cooler went out and I was embarrassed to let the repair guy see how messy the garage was).  I store most of our dog stuff in the garage.  All the things we need when we go to agility trials and travel with the dogs are stored there.  I have everything sorted into boxes by type but I am thinking I should use a box or two for evacuation supplies.  If I need the items for travel or a trial they are still right there where I can easily get to them but if there was an emergency I could just grab the box and not have to worry about rummaging through a bunch of boxes to find what I need.

And, yes, my day was ruined.  I was trying to express my concern in a helpful, non-judgemental, way.  Thankfully, my oldest child is getting her masters in English and is helping me write a letter to his supervisor.
That's way more constructive than what I would have done, which would be to lie awake the entire night imagining what I could have said to shut the idiot right up.

My garage was a complete pile of junk. I decided one day to just work on finding the things I could throw away. We have those huge garbage cans that the truck picks up and dumps and they only allow one per house and they pick up twice per week. I filled the can every single time for 3 weeks, so 6 huge garbage cans full of stuff that at some point I thought I needed to keep, but I really didn't. After that, getting a handle on my garage was fairly easy, but I still have a few boxes that I am dreading sorting through. They are my husbands space memorabilia, since he had worked in the space program for many years. If he had taken care of them, they might be worth something, but they were just thrown in a box in the garage. I don't think I can just throw away a picture of the Challenger astronauts that is autographed by all of them, but it's stained, wrinkled, and full of cat hair. A whole box(or three) of stuff like that.

I'm doing the same process in my house, one drawer, one closet, at a time. I'm liking my house so much better now. I desire to become a minimalist. It may be a challenge for a lifetime.
I would love to be a minimalist but don't think it is in my personality to get to that point.  I am attempting to get rid of everything we don't want or need.  I have a huge pile of stuff that needs to be taken to the charity shop and if I folded down the seats in my minivan it would take at least three trips to get rid of all of it so I must be making some progress.  I couldn't believe the excessive amount of extra bedding and linens we own.  I have a local pet store that I purchase food from and they have a bin to donate old towels, pillows, etc. for a local shelter and I have dropped off stuff three times and had so much I had to take it to their back room.  Two kids at University bringing home bedding that can't be used in the home and 20 year old towels (I don't know what I do to towels but they never completely wear out).

That is a bit heartbreaking about the Challenger photo.  My oldest won a contest when she was in high school and has a photo of her with all the other state contest winners on the White House steps with President Bush.  I have kept it safe and it is in the original envelope addressed to my kid with the return address "The White House".  A very wonderful event in my daughter's life but what do I do with the photo?  I am doing the same process as you.  Working through every small space.  It is why I got to thinking about planning for emergencies.  I can plan because I am not worrying about all the extra stuff.
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